Your Love Brings Health and Hope to Nepal

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One of the new hand pumps installed in Sinurjoda, thanks to people like you.

In rural southeastern Nepal there is a village called Sinurjoda. One section of that village, Ward 7, is inhabited almost exclusively by Dalit people.

These are the untouchables, the marginalized, the outcast. They suffer from poverty and disease. They lack education, clean water and sanitation.

During the last two years, thanks to your compassionate gifts, they have been guided by workers from Lalgadh Leprosy Services Center, a long-time American Leprosy Missions partner, who have helped them form women’s groups and farmers’ groups.

These groups have been saving small amounts of money and pooling their resources so they can offer members microloans. The Lalgadh staff have also been bringing them health messages, advice on social issues and awareness of rights and duties.

Now, thanks to the support of people like you, and grants from the United Methodist Committee on Relief and Franklin First United Methodist Church, we have launched a new project that is generating great excitement in Sinurjoda Ward 7: WASH (Water, Sanitation and Hygiene).

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Laxminiya Devi is proud of the toilet she built for her family.

This new project will improve hygiene and sanitation for 1,415 children, men and women by installing toilets and water hand pumps.

Laxminiya Devi is on the local WASH Committee. She says, “Before the people from Lalgadh came here there was no awareness of the consequences of bad hygiene and sanitation, even I didn’t really know anything about it. But I learned and I built a toilet for my family. You can come and see it any time.”

Because of partners like you, people like Laxminiya Devi are being empowered to improve the health of their village; they are transforming their community from within. And they are being restored to lives of dignity and hope.

Thank you for making a real and lasting difference in the lives of the poor, marginalized and leprosy-affected in Nepal.